Sunday

Story Stuff


So here is a really fun drawing that Kyle Marshall did for the storyboard. In this scene, Boyd is freaking out because he sees that his owner is about to turn on the radio. He knows that once that happens, Mock’s dancing will undoubtedly ensue.

So, at this point in production, we have really started to nail down the main plot points for the story. Our process so far has worked like this: Rita gave us the main idea for what was going to happen, (Mock is the fun loving bird that starts to dance around in the cage and this drives Boyd crazy). So, from there, Kyle and I started to verbally pitch ideas back and forth to come up with gags. We watched a bunch of old Loony Tune cartoons to really get us in the right frame of mind. We then wrote up a short 2-page write up of a situation that could happen. Once that was done, we sent it down to Rita where she tweaked parts and came up with new gags to toss in. So then we went through a few versions, each one getting a little stronger with each re-write.

What I’ve learnt through writing over the years is that you can never hold any idea or gag too close to your heart. Each idea is a collaborated effort, from gag to gag, and even though one idea might be the funniest joke known to man, if it doesn’t tell the story or if it isn’t true to your character’s identity, you sometimes just have to cut it out. Whenever I write a story, I like to verbally pitch it a few times to my close friends and family. Doing this really helps me to figure out if my story is captivating enough to keep the persons’ interest. A lot of times while doing this, just the fact of having to explain, or even better act out, everything that’s happing in the short allows you to get a better sense of timing and of the characters personality. John K (Ren and Stimpy creator) once told me, you gotta run the cartoon in your head, do it in the dark or close your eyes, so that you can truly visualize everything that’s happening and just act it out.

Another thing Kyle and I did a lot in the story process is pitch to each other and record the conversations. We did this because your ideas can flow really fast, and there’s no time to write things down when you’re really on to something. So, once we were done pitching the ideas back and forth to each other, we’d listen to the recorded conversation a couple of times to hear our ideas again and start to write down the additional gags that we thought were the strongest.

8 comments:

SHANE PRIGMORE said...

THis looks like fun stuff!

13toon's said...

i have to say i wish i was a fly on the wall when you guy's are doing your thing. can't wait to see tthe finish product. bye 4 now

Ken Chandler said...

It's good to know 'process' (how different people approach projects, brainstorm, etc.). I've also found that what you said about getting emotionally attached to an idea is true of character design too. Great sketches, love to see the creative process. Thanks for sharing yours.

Randeep Katari said...

Hey guys!
Thanks so much for the comment, it means a lot to know someone's actually looking at my stuff and doesn't think it sucks! Also, thanks for allowing us in on your process, I'll definitely keep this in mind while figuring out the details of my short!
Thanks again
-R.

13toon's said...

thanks for the two great comments, and you guy's have always amaze me, keep killing it because i can't wait to see the finish product. it is going to be amazing, bye 4 now.

Andrew Coats said...

this is looking great! Very appealing designs

Simona said...

Funny! I want to see it!

Andre Barnwell said...

OH man cant wait to see this bad boy. That looks like a pros production still. Crazy!